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About Callander

Callander then...

Callander is a small Scottish town with a population of 2700. It is located at the junction of the rivers Teith and Lenny and is widely regarded as the gateway to the Highlands. It has a rich history having played host to various peoples throughout the ages with the remains of a Pictish fort and a Roman camp evidencing this habitation.

Made famous at the beginning of the 19th century by the works of the novelist, Sir Walter Scott, Callander was established as a holiday destination. The present town was laid out in the 18th century. Its focal point is the well-proportioned Ancaster Square in front of St Kessogs Church, now home to the Tourist Information Office. The building has been renamed, the Rob Roy Centre, after a famous local historical character. According to tradition St Kessog, a missionary from Ireland, first preached the gospel beside the Teith 14 centuries ago.

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Callander now...

Callander is an important part of the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park.

A holiday destination with many pursuits available of varying degrees of exertion. A modern Leisure Complex providing an extensive range of activities, a PGA golf course, excellent salmon and trout fishing (loch &river), breathtaking woodland and mountain walking, many miles of cycle paths and tracks (mountain bikes can be hired locally or for the more adventurous a tandem might suit). A superb base for touring the bens and glens of Scotland.

There are several scenic walks around the town including two starting immediately beside the Knowe Guest House. The first leads to the Callander Crags, which rise 1000ft above sea level and provide breathtaking views from its summit over the surrounding countryside. The second leads to the waterfall of Bracklin, a magnificent cascade. To the north west of the town lies Ben Ledi, rising 2875 feet, providing both rocky climbs for the mountaineers or easier paths for walkers.

For those wishing a leisurely drive, the Trossachs, which start on the outskirts of town, provide a microcosm of Scottish landscape. This area is well served with places to stop the car and enjoy the magnificent scenery. The town of Callander is both compact and convenient. Numerous hotels, bars and restaurants provide visitors with an extensive choice of refreshment and cuisine including a specialist fish restaurant. The main street contains many shops with a variety of different products including an Internet café , keeping our visitors in touch with their loved ones.

Live entertainment is available at a number of different venues ranging from traditional Scottish celdhi to modern music or, for the more participative, karaoke. During the summer months the local pipe band performs in the square twice a week for appreciative visitors and locals.